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June 24 2017

griffithnsff
5686 46ce 500
To attain power over others, seduction works better than coercion.


Picture yourself as Chuko Liang, head strategist for the ancient Chinese state of Shu: War has been declared on China by King Menghuo from the south and quitting him and saving the country lies in your hands.


But before learning everything you should do, it’s crucial to know what not to do.


To start with, using force and coercive tactics is never wise, even when they’re the most easy option. Actually, if you do exercise your strength, folks will secretly resent you because force breeds resistance. Liang didn’t assault with force and knew this, even though he probably would have defeated the invading army.


But if he'd, Menghuo might have resented China and Liang and the state would need to constantly shield itself. Everyone bred and involved paranoia would have exhausted.


 Folks have a tendency to be commanded by their emotions, and you can get them do everything you need – of their own free will by playing on their feelings.


You are able to do this by then unexpectedly treating them, and threatening your opponent so that pain is expected by them. For instance, when Menghuo attacked China, Liang seized him and his whole army. To his great surprise he was offered delicious food and wine rather, although Menghuo anticipated the worst and was separated from his soldiers.


While his enemy’s soldiers were released by Liang, he'd only let Menghuo go when the enemy king promised that if he was caught again, he'd bow to the Chinese king.


And while Liang got Menghuo several more times, he always let him go. Afterward, on the seventh capture, Menghuo dropped to Liang’s feet, surrendering his kingdom and himself.


Despite the fact that Liang could have killed Menghuo when he was captured by him, a proven fact the enemy king was conscious of, he gave him plenty of chances and treated him nicely each time. As a result, Menghuo grew increasingly grateful and indebted to the Chinese king, until he eventually surrendered of his own volition.
Reposted bydaniel-siegfriedpotatolovero

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